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Best Lighting Options for Kids’ Rooms

by Kaitlin Krull 12 August, 2016 11:01

Selecting the right lighting for your kids’ bedroom might seem like a straightforward task. However, different kinds of lighting can affect our moods and behaviors in different ways. If you’re struggling to find the perfect lighting combination for your children, consider the environment you want to create and start from there. Here’s a list of several types of lighting, from practical and functional to whimsical and fun, that will leave both you and your kids satisfied. 

Calming lights

When it comes to lighting, color temperature is far more important than many of us might think. Bulbs with a color temperature at or below 3,000 K are, counterintuitively, considered warm lights and promote relaxation and calm. When choosing between lighting options for your kids’ bedrooms, opt for warmer bulbs in nightstand lamps and perhaps even in overhead lights to help your kids wind down at the end of the day.

Productivity increasing lights

If warmer lights promote calm, one can logically conclude that cooler lights promote the opposite. Choosing lights with a color temperature above 5,000 K—the official starting point for cool colors—will help your kids to keep their concentration and increase their productivity. We recommend bright LED lights like these, which mimic clear and bright daylight, for desk areas, playrooms, and kids’ bathrooms.

Adaptable and smart lights

If your kids’ bedroom functions differently at different times of the day, why not choose a dimmable light that can adapt to a variety of situations and environments? Smart lighting options such as Philips Hue and Sengled Element Touch use technology to connect to compatible wireless hubs and allow you to control your lighting from a smartphone or tablet application. This option is particularly appropriate if you already make use of other smart technologies in your home.

Decorative lights

While the latest advances in science and technology are interesting to parents, kids’ lighting choices are far more basic. For kids who insist on cool and trendy decorative lights, there are plenty of choices to suit the desires of just about everyone. Decorative string lights in a variety of styles, unique colored lights, or even fluorescent black lights are available to complete your kids’ bedroom look. One tip: less is more here, so make sure there are a few standard lighting options available in your children’s room as well.

Safe lights

Parents of very young children and kids who have a penchant for destruction may want to consider the safety of their chosen lighting options. Extra safe bulbs come with an additional safety coating that contains any fragments in the event of breakage. Commonly used in the food industry, these kinds of safety bulbs are perfect for kids’ rooms and come in a variety of styles and sizes to suit your needs.

About the Writer

 Kaitlin Krull is a writer and mom of two girls living the expat life in the UK. She enjoys writing for Modernize.com with the goal of empowering homeowners with the expert guidance and educational tools they need to take on home projects with confidence.

Tags:

General | Smart Lighting & Controls

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