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CEO's Take: What the EcoPinion Survey Says About Us, and the Future of Lighting

by Mike Connors 26 May, 2011 05:39

Mike Connors joined the Bulbs.com team in 2000, and was selected as Chief Executive Officer in 2009. Prior to becoming CEO, he spent several years serving as VP of Sales.

The March 2011 EcoPinion survey entitled “Lighting the Path Forward for Greater Energy Efficiency” offers interesting if not insightful commentary regarding the acceptance and usage of energy efficient lighting products by U.S. households.

It’s important to note that at first glance one might believe that a survey conducted by an organization named “Ecoalign” would be slanted in some way toward favorable opinions of energy efficient or green products because the respondents were predominantly environmentalists – This is not the case. The methodology used for the survey used a statistically significant sampling size of respondents who were targeted according to gender, age, census region and ethnicity. The sample was drawn from Survey Sampling International’s SurveySpot online consumer panel, an organization that is highly regarded as a sample provider in the market research industry.

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LED: The Accidental Bug Light

by Bryan Trainor 20 May, 2011 05:19

As the weather gets nicer, people flock to their porches and yards. Unfortunately, so do bugs. If you’re looking to reduce the bugs around your outdoor lights but don’t like the look of yellow bug lights, LED might just be the perfect solution.

Traditional bug lights tend to be identifiable by their yellow color. The reason for this is that traditional bulbs emit light across a wide spectrum, including ultraviolet (UV) light. This light is invisible to humans but is highly attractive to insects. The yellow coating of a bug light is designed to filter out most of this ultraviolet light; they’re not designed to repel insects but to simply be less attractive to them.

In addition to the other benefits LED bulbs offer, most LEDs emit light in a very narrow spectrum and do not emit UV light, and are therefore not attractive to bugs. Many bulbs in our LED lineup are also damp location rated, so they’re ideal for outdoor use as long as they’re not directly exposed to the weather or completely enclosed.

If you want to save energy, increase life, and reduce bugs in your outdoor spaces, LED might just be the right light for you.

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General | Tips and Tricks

A Tale of Two Bulbs: The Importance of Quality in LED Lighting

by Christina Crow-Dufault 14 April, 2011 06:27

When shopping around for LED bulbs, it doesn’t take long to run into huge variances in price, wattage, and guarantees. Lots of people ask about the differences between them. The fact is, while the number of high-quality and high performance LED products is increasing every day, there are quite a few products out there that just aren’t built to perform or to last. 

In terms of technology, an LED bulb shares a lot more in common with a consumer electronics device than it does with a typical filament based light bulb. You wouldn’t have the same expectations of a $30 camera as you would a $300 camera, and that’s a good mindset to have when looking for an LED bulb as well. There are a number of components that are critical to a viable LED lighting product, and any bulb is only as good as its weakest link.

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Cooler Than Ever- Halogen IR Bulbs Use Less Energy, Last Longer, Generate Less Heat

by Chris Weber 3 December, 2010 10:15

CFLs and LEDs have generated a lot of attention over the last few years, but they're still not the best fit for every socket. There are some applications, such as those using dimmers, timers, and photo sensors, where halogen bulbs are still the best choice. If you're looking for increased efficiency from these sockets, look no further than halogen infrared.

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LED – Is It Right For You?

by Eric Cole 23 September, 2010 05:18

Eric Cole is Bulbs.com's Category Manager for LED lighting products.

 

I know that many of our customers are trying to educate themselves about LED technology. In a sense, most of us in the industry are doing the same thing. LED technology has been around for some time and we at Bulbs.com have been following its progress very closely, but what LED is going to look like as a widespread, effective, and reliable everyday lighting solution is still evolving.  Here are some thoughts on what to look for, and what to look out for, when considering a transition to LEDs.

Let’s look at the benefits

LEDs are most well known for their extremely long life and energy efficiency. LED useful life is based on the number of operating hours until the LED is emitting 70% of its initial light output.  Top quality LEDs in well-designed fixtures are expected to have a useful life of 30,000 to 50,000 hours, significantly higher than the 1,000 hours for a typical incandescent bulb and 8,000 to 10,000 hours for a comparable CFL. LEDs usually don’t “burn out” like incandescent bulbs do.  Instead, they get progressively dimmer over time. This can be helpful in critical lighting areas. They also tend to use less than one-sixth as much energy as their incandescent or halogen counterparts, and 2-3 times less than most CFLs. More...

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Hot, Hot, Hot! Cold Cathode CFLs are both dimmable and flashable

by Chris Weber 8 September, 2010 07:28

Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps (CCFLs) have been around for about five years, but don't get the consideration they often deserve. They have more than double the life of standard Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and are better incandescent bulb replacements for dimming and flashing applications.

A quick technical overview

CCFL and CFL technologies are very similar - they both use integrated ballasts to regulate electrical current into a glass tube to excite mercury and phosphors and make UV light. The biggest differences between the two technologies are the type, temp, and resiliency of the cathodes used at the ends of the glass tubes. Standard CFL cathodes incorporate a thin tungsten wire that gets to 900°F while CCFL cathodes are more like solid metal thimbles that peak around 200°F (a "cold" cathode, relatively speaking.) Because the CCFL cathodes are more durable, they can be hit with more voltage (about 5 X) more often than standard CFLs and that opens up opportunities to use CCFL in applications where CFL products consistently fail. More...

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How to Pick a Compact Fluorescent Bulb

by Mike Connors 3 September, 2010 06:37

If you were disappointed by the performance of CFL bulbs in the last few years, it's time to try again.

Though we call them light bulbs, traditional incandescent bulbs are actually small heaters that give off a little bit of light - something you know if you've ever touched a bulb that's been on for a while. These bulbs were technological wonders when they were patented in 1880, but today they are inefficient dinosaurs. They waste energy and money, and they are responsible for millions of tons of pollution that contribute to global warming.

The next generation of CFL light bulbs

The next generation of Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) now give off higher-quality light while still using a fraction of the electricity as their earlier predecessors. Using CFLs puts less strain on the electric grid and saves you money. CFLs also reduce air pollution and the greenhouse gasses that cause global warming buy using less energy: if every household in the country replaced just three 60-watt incandescent light bulbs with CFLs, we would reduce as much pollution as if we took 3.5 million cars off the roads! More...

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Light Bulb Recycling – It’s a bright idea

by Mike Connors 30 August, 2010 11:08

Most business owners are unaware of new laws that not only mandate energy efficiency products (and regulate the use of mercury in these products), but also their disposal. Hefty fines can be levied for those that don’t comply.

In specific:

  • The EPA and many states have enacted new laws that dictate requirements for the disposal of many types of light bulbs and ballasts. In many areas, fluorescent, metal halide, high-pressure sodium and mercury vapor bulbs can no longer be disposed of in the trash.
  • Business owners who replace their own lighting should consult with their local municipality, utility or use resources such as www.lamprecycle.org to determine if they need to recycle and if so, how and where to do it properly. Of course, even where recycling is not mandated business owners should give consideration to proper disposal. Lamprecycle.org has a cool application on the site to identify the nearest recycling provider to your business. Additionally, you can purchase recycling containers online. These prepaid boxes and pails ensure that your light bulbs are recycled properly. A recycling certificate is also available upon request. More...

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